SAEN LogoYale Negligence Kills, Abuses Hundreds of Research Subjects - Animals Suffocated, Starved, Dehydrated, Drowned, According to Watchdog's Audit
Press Release - From SAEN Stop Animal Exploitation Now

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday, February 12, 2018
Contact: Michael Budkie, SAEN 513-575-5517 (cell) [email protected]

Yale Negligence Kills, Abuses Hundreds of Research Subjects -
Animals Suffocated, Starved, Dehydrated, Drowned, According to Watchdog's Audit

NEW HAVEN, CT Hundreds of animals were negligently killed and abused at Yale University, according to an audit by a national watchdog group, who called the results "shocking."

SAEN, an Ohio-based nonprofit that monitors U.S. research facilities for violations of law and animal abuse, said its audit of Yale University's animal experimentation program, revealed according to internal correspondence that over 250 animals were negligently killed or abused in just under two years.

SAEN said causes of death included suffocation, drowning, heat stress, starvation and dehydration. Animals were also denied required pain relief, or had tails clipped without pain relief.

Eleven Yale letters obtained by SAEN admit wrongdoing and negligence to a federal funding agency, and were never intended to be made public.

SAEN said its contacted Yale's President, Peter Salovey, to insist on an independent investigation and the termination of staff who are responsible for the negligence and abuse.

SAEN claims that Yale's research administration has failed to do its job in a rush to approve grants and bring in funding, having acquired over $150 million in federal grants.

"This is shocking. And the reality is that Yale has been more interested in attracting federal grant money than keeping animals alive," said Michael A. Budkie, A.H.T., SAEN executive director and co-founder.

"Yale clams to be 'committed to conducting quality animal research in an ethical and responsible manner,' but if that were true, animals would not be dead from starvation, dehydration, drowning, suffocation and heat stress," said Budkie.

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